Pelvic Exercises Prolapse Strengthening Techniques

Pelvic exercises prolapse strength training techniques can improve prolapse support and reducing prolapse symptoms. They are designed to reduce the likelihood of prolapse recurring after prolapse surgery. Pelvic exercises for prolapse are an important part of long-term prolapse self management.

These pelvic exercises prolapse techniques are designed to help strengthen your pelvic floor with a prolapse, to reduce prolapse symptoms and improve prolapse support. They have been written by Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist Michelle Kenway, author of Inside Out– the essential woman’s guide to pelvic support.

This article can be downloaded below as a user friendly PDF by scrolling down.

How to Strengthen Your Prolapse

1. Feel your pelvic floor muscles

pelvic floor exercises for prolapse

Make sure you can feel your pelvic floor muscles working correctly before you start your pelvic floor exercise program. If you are not sure about your correct technique how to check your pelvic exercise technique can be viewed on our free complimentary video which can be accessed immediately to the right of this article.

If you cannot feel our pelvic floor exercises for prolapse or if you are unsure that you are performing the correct pelvic exercise technique you may push your prolapse down and make your symptoms worse as shown here in diagram 1.

2. Exercise early in your day

Perform your pelvic exercises at the start of your day. Try to do a set of exercises before you even get out of bed. This is the time of day when your pelvic floor muscles are fresh and ready to exercise.  This is the time they will strengthen best. Try to perform two to three sets of your pelvic floor exercises before midday to get the most out of your pelvic floor exercise program.

3. Choose anti gravity positions

Pelvic exercises for prolapse can be easier for some women with prolapse when starting out lying down rather than standing up. When you stand up, the prolapsed tissue bulges down through the vagina or anus. Using anti gravity positions means that your prolapse will not drag down and this should make your pelvic exercises easier to perform. You can choose from a number of anti gravity positions; kneeling resting your weight through your forearms, side lying, prone or on your back. As your pelvic floor strength improves you may be able to progress to sitting and standing positions for your exercises.

4. Reduce or reposition your prolapse

To reduce your prolapse means to gently reposition it if you can.  Heavy prolapsed tissue will make your pelvic floor exercises more difficult to perform.  Prolapsed bladder or uterus can be very heavy for weak pelvic floor muscles to lift, especially if the prolapse is bulging down out of the vagina. Try to keep prolapsed rectal tissue within the rectum rather than bulging out through the anus and encourage the pelvic floor muscles to support your prolapsed tissues within your body by performing your exercises with your prolapse reduced. This technique makes vaginal and rectal prolapse exercises most effective.

5. Use your pelvic floor muscles to protect

Use your pelvic floor muscles with any strain on your prolapse. A strong pelvic floor contraction will help to support and protect your prolapse form becoming worse with specific activities and daily events. Try to strongly lift and squeeze your pelvic floor muscles before and during every event that places pressure on your pelvic floor and your prolapse such as: coughing, sneezing, blowing your nose or heavy lifting. Lift and squeeze your pelvic floor muscles after toileting and make this a habit that you perform every time.

6. Speak to your doctor or Physiotherapist about a pessary

Your gynaecologist may have mentioned the possibility of using a pessary to support your vaginal prolapse. A pessary device will not make your pelvic floor muscles weak. In fact, a pessary can help to lift prolapsed tissue off the pelvic floor muscles.  Women who are successfully fitted with a vaginal pessary frequently report that their pelvic floor exercises become much easier to perform than previously without the pessary in place. A pessary is not necessarily suitable for everyone but it may be worth discussing as an option with your gynaecologist if you are interested in this option.

These pelvic exercises prolapse strengthening techniques have been used with success by many women to more effectively exercise with a prolapse. Choose from those tips that suit you and your lifestyle. If you are able to improve your pelvic floor strength with more effective pelvic floor exercise then your ability to support and protect your prolapse long-term will undoubtedly improve too.

PDF Download this Pelvic Floor Exercises for Prolapse article as a user friendly PDF


prolapse exercises

with Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist Michelle Kenway

Learn how to exercise safely, strengthen your prolapse and reduce your risk of prolapse worsening.

Prolapse Exercises is a complete exercise guide for women with prolapse seeking to exercise safely and protect their pelvic floor.




  1. Hi I found the tips on the home page really informative thank you.

  2. I’m not sure if I have a prolapse. I just had my third baby 5 weeks ago, and I don’t have any symptoms from what I’ve read. However, after a recent BM, I felt strange down there so I had a looksy. There’s nothing coming out or anything, it just looks swollen. I had a homebirth, and I have not seen my Ob/Gyn for my 6 week checkup yet.

    • Michelle Kenway says:

      Hi Layla
      Best to get a professional assessment from your Ob/Gyn or Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist so that you know exactly what’s happening
      All the best