Treadmill Walking Tips for Pelvic Floor Safe Fitness

How can you keep your treadmill walking pelvic floor friendly?

This treadmill walking exercise video gives you quick tips for pelvic floor safe treadmill walking.

Video duration: 2 minutes 50

Suitability: general

Please scroll down below this treadmill machine exercise video for more information, guidelines and pelvic floor safe exercise modifications

Treadmill walking is an excellent low impact cardiovascular fitness exercise that’s well suited to many women.

There is unlikely to be any major difference in the amount of  pelvic floor impact when comparing outdoor walking with treadmill walking so choose what works best for your body and your lifestyle.

Health Benefits of Treadmill Walking

Treadmill walking has many potential benefits for women including:

  • Weight loss and weight control
  • Decreased risk of some chronic diseases (e.g. Type 2 diabetes, colon cancer)
  • Decreased risk of heart disease
  • Decreased mental decline with aging
  • Improved mood and relaxation
  • Improved mental health (e.g. prolapse anxiety)
  • Improved mobility with arthritis
  • Better balance

How to Keep Treadmill Walking Pelvic Floor Friendly

1. Walk With Good Posture

Your walking posture affects how well your pelvic floor muscles function.

Good upright posture helps to promote good deep abdominal and pelvic floor function. When walking on the treadmill walk correct your upright posture by lifting the crown of your head towards the ceiling and lengthening your spine.

Gently activate your deep abdominal muscles if you’re able to as you walk. Try to avoid slouching forwards when walking. Slouching increases the load on your pelvic floor.

2. Treadmill Incline

Keep the treadmill flat when walking.

Walking on an incline tends to make your body lean forwards to stay balanced. Walking on a flat surface will allow you to stride out to promote fitness and walk with good tall posture.

3. Minimise Impact

Choose a variety of cardiovascular fitness exercises rather than repeating the same treadmill walking exercises day after day. An appropriate variety of exercises can help to protect your joints, lessen impact on your pelvic floor and promote better weight management than repeated the same fitness exercises every workout.

Wear well cushioned supportive footwear to support the arches of your feet and lessen impact on your lower limbs and pelvic floor.

Key Points for Treadmill Walking

Treadmill walking is an excellent cardiovascular fitness exercise for women.

Keep your treadmill walking pelvic floor friendly by:

1. Walking with good tall posture
2. Keeping the treadmill flat
3. Gently engaging your deep abdominal muscles
4. Choosing a variety of low impact cardiovascular fitness exercises

Next: How to Keep Your Rowing Machine Pelvic Floor Friendly

Comments

  1. Hi my name is Violet i got a pessery put in 2 months ago i have been in a lot of pain when at work i’m a carer witch is a heavy job and do a lot of walking when walking i feel sore and feel tired most of the time is this normal i’ve took the pessary out it was so uncomfortable

  2. Hi Michelle
    Few weeks ago i did some floor exercises including planking, about 3days later i noticed pain in my lower abdomen especially when i sneeze or cough. Pain now getting better, what exercises can i do safely . 9months post hysterectomy.

    • Author: Michelle Kenway Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist says

      Hi Liz
      Good to hear that the discomfort is resolving, see your doctor if it recurs. To avoid abdominal strain at this stage when you’ve had sufficient time to recover from this issue start with gentle core abdominal exercises only such as the ones in this core exercise video. I tend to avoid full Plank for most women post hysterectomy in favor of modified forward plank or side plank (provided no shoulder issues). Return to exercise post op is very individual, take your time and progress gradually rather than straight back into intense core exercises such as full forward Plank, all the best

  3. Michelle,
    I have so enjoyed your videos and website. I’ve learned so much, However I wish I’d come across them sooner. I’m an avid walker and enjoy biking outside. I had a TVH and bladder prolapse surgery 10 months ago. Feeling great and back to normal short of the 15 extra pounds since then. I recently agreed to join the local gym with my son. Without considering my pelvic floor muscles, I proceeded to walk at a moderately fast walk on an incline for 1 hour each day for a week. It felt wonderfully empowering to be back at the gym (I’m 56 !), but by the end of the week the ligaments in my pelvis hurt terribly. I feel just like I did after surgery. Now I know why after all the info I’ve read on your site. Thank you! My question is: do I just rest and the ligaments will heal? If so then am I’m safe to go back using proper pelvic floor workouts?
    Thanks
    Susan

    • Author: Michelle Kenway Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist says

      Hi Susan
      Take it slowly, the gym can be like a potential minefield for the unsuspecting and vulnerable pelvic floor. Rest now to recover, you may even trial support (full) briefs when you recommence (flat) slow walking. Stationary cycle on low resistance will allow you to exercise and avoid straining your tummy. The constant impact and pounding of the treadmill isn’t kind to our joints or our vulnerable internal tissues and ligaments. Remember they will also be under some additional load with weight gained since your surgery. Manage your weight primarily with your diet, pounding on the treadmill will do more harm than good after prolapse surgery. Choose variety in the cardio exercises you choose, cycle, elliptical, a little walking and work up to it gradually. If you’re worried about your tummy and it doesn’t settle down see your doctor. Likely this is a gentle reminder from your body that all isn’t what it was in the past and heed this reminder. All the best Susan, slow and steady

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